Personality, Compatibility, and Personal Timing Are Measurable With Comprehensive Handwriting Analysis, Astrology, and Numerology

Home  |  Blog
Sign up for your free 17 Tips to Help You Reduce Business and Personal Related Risk
  • Reduce Wasted Time and Monetary Loss
  • Minimize Squandered Opportunities
  • Avoid Unsafe and Unreliable People
 
These 17 tips involving background checks, security investigations, personality assessment, forecasting, and cyclical timing analysis will help you greatly reduce your overall risk, save time and money, and gain more peace of mind in your business, career, or personal life.
 
Name
E-mail
You may easily unsubscribe at any time and we
don't share or sell e-mail lists
 

Posts Tagged ‘security investigations’

Common Personality Traits That Kill Relationships

Sunday, November 5th, 2017
Share Button

Everyone has his or her own unique personality talents and flaws. My findings show the primary characteristics are inborn.

It’s unfortunate that unconventional appraisal methods aren’t universally part of every young person’s schooling to discover and understand his or her key strengths and weaknesses.

Currently, everyone must discover his or her own personality through trial and error, or through conventional evaluation methods, which typically fail to uncover the authentic personality.

Below I list typical relationship personality red flag traits that wreck personal and professional relationships. I readily identify all subconscious personality traits listed below in my exclusive analyses.

Lack of a reasonable sense of discernment and critical analysis skills translates into the inability to identify and understand personality and relationship issues, and possibly naiveté and gullibility. Combine it with lack of objectivity and the person is likely to avoid taking responsibility for his or her actions. Dishonesty also complicates matters.

Emotional immaturity and, or volatility shows a lack of emotional development and security. He or she will act on emotions (instead of reason), to his or her detriment.

Impulsiveness, lack of control over urges, and recklessness yield poor decision-making, among other challenges.

Self-esteem and ego strength relates to the amount of self-approval and the ability to cope with rejection. Vanity, arrogance, and narcissism are signs of an unhealthy ego. A “big ego” is actually a weak ego.

Conflict avoidance results from a fear of friction in relationships and a fear of not being liked. It’s due to any number of subconscious defense mechanisms such as disassociation, evasiveness, rationalization, secrecy, self-deceit, and vanity.

Suspiciousness, or a fear of trusting people, along with withdrawal or emotionally drawing back, makes relationships an uphill battle.

Other common relationship red flag traits include fear of intimacy, self-consciousness, and fear of sex (or excessive interest in sex).

Personality challenges are more easily recognized under less than ideal circumstances, such as when the person is under a lot of pressure. You’ll only see the persona until something triggers the subconscious fears and defenses.

Knowing a person’s authentic personality gives you understanding, which can ease conflict. It can also greatly limit your overall level of risk.

Copyright © 2017 Scott Petullo

Identifying Weakness in Personality Strengths

Monday, May 8th, 2017
Share Button

Everyone’s personality strengths and weaknesses are unique and sometimes personality strengths can become detriments.

Under pressure, facades melt away and the true personality traits emerge; sometimes it takes months or even years to get to know an individual’s real flaws.

Since there isn’t a shortage of miscreants in this world, it’s perfectly acceptable to get to the heart of another person’s character; it’s wise to decrease your vulnerability and exposure to excessive risk by any ethical means possible.

You can’t control the actions of a potential business partner, romantic partner, associate, friend, or adversary, but you can get to know them well enough to minimize your risk.

Below I list five personality strengths and the frequently embedded personality challenges in those strengths.

  1. You can be confident an associate with a high degree of discretion won’t disclose confidential information. However, excessive secretiveness and a lack of transparency can derail even the most successful partnerships.
  2. It’s best if a commission-based salesperson, for example, is motivated mainly by money, but excessive acquisitiveness can be a heavy liability for any organization. Clearly, it can be a big problem in marriages or other partnerships too. It’s a fascinating dynamic of the human mind—people regularly give you pretend reasons for their actions, and even believe those reasons, while the actual motivations are hidden in their subconscious mind. Few things in a person’s core behavior are controlled by conscious motives.
  3. Strong attention to detail is praiseworthy in many professions, but excessive perfectionism makes one miss the bigger picture and impedes success.
  4. People who are easy-going and non-judgmental are usually well-liked. However, a lack of objectivity, and a deficient sense of discernment and critical thinking skills yields poor problem solving ability, thus hinders goal-attainment.
  5. Those with a strong sense of responsibility are appreciated, but in the extreme, a savior complex makes one act to his or her detriment.

Nobody is perfect, though it can save you a lot of time and money to look beyond personas to authentic personality, which can be discerned through various methods, including my unorthodox security investigations.

 Copyright © 2017 Scott Petullo

Secrecy—How to Know if You Can Trust Someone

Sunday, January 29th, 2017
Share Button

“If you wish another to keep your secret, first keep it to yourself.” Seneca

Everyone has secrets, ranging from inconsequential to momentous.

Secrecy is an integral part of the human experience, largely having to do with the mostly harmless natural defense mechanism to maintain your peace of mind and save face.

For example, you don’t announce to your Facebook friends the graphic details of your most recent red-hot fling to save yourself the embarrassment, even though such posts would be exceedingly entertaining and could make you a social media star.

Sometimes you’re required to share your secrets, such as within a business or investment partnership.

Secrecy is desirable in matters of confidentiality; discretion is necessary to protect proprietary information.

Although it’s feasible extreme secrecy can be a serious liability in partnerships, keeping one’s mouth shut is generally considered advantageous. As long as the intent isn’t to deceive, and extreme withholding doesn’t infringe on trust between associates, it won’t cause problems. 

Of all the personality traits I consider in my character analyses, secrecy is one of the most fascinating for me to examine. It’s very easy for some to keep secrets, but impossible for others.

Extremes are easy to discern, particularly involving people who can’t keep it zipped even if their life depended on it.

Other than my or another professional’s analyses to warn you ahead of time, a way to know if you can trust someone is to spend a lot of time with them. Unfortunately, you open yourself up to a lot of risk in doing so.

It’s okay to keep secrets. In fact, it’s necessary in many cases, such as guarding exclusive information or protecting someone’s safety.

Make sure you avoid trusting the wrong person, but also avoid unnecessary, extreme withholding.

Copyright © 2017 Scott Petullo

Face Analyzing Technology Possibly Identifies Terrorists

Monday, July 11th, 2016
Share Button

A facial personality profiling technology company claims to be able to evaluate specific personality traits with 80% accuracy, including those that help to identify terrorists.

They allegedly identified nine of the eleven Paris (11-13-2015 attack) terrorists “after the fact as potential terrorists with no prior knowledge,” while only three of the eleven terrorists had a previous record.

The science behind face analysis involves genetic predisposition, the face being a reflection of DNA.

Behavioral geneticists contend that DNA predetermines a person’s physical, emotional, and psychological nature to a great extent.

I agree that key elements of a person’s character are predetermined, despite it being a politically incorrect view. Though I believe it ultimately has to do with personal fate, and DNA is merely a reflection of that.

It seems logical to me that select personality traits can be identified through face analysis, considering a thorough enough analysis involving extensive empirical research.

Physiognomy, including astrological physiognomy, has existed for over 2000 years (only superficial forms of it have been “discredited”). I regularly witness how extreme patterns represent distinct characteristics, such as saturnine temperament and, or appearance, symbolized by Saturn playing a key role in the person’s comprehensive astrology charts.

Instead of saying facial analysis can be used to “…predict a person’s personality and behavior,” I’d say it identifies personality traits.

By itself, at 80% accuracy (which is good for any single form of analysis), means twenty percent of travelers could be falsely identified as terrorists. But security experts (at least those whose hands aren’t tied by political correctness) use body language, high-tech anxiety measuring devices, sophisticated data tracking systems, and a host of other means to ferret out terrorists. Thus, people shouldn’t be concerned about being falsely labeled a criminal through facial analysis.

Copyright © 2016 Scott Petullo

Personality Analysis Secret: How to Quickly Read Someone

Monday, June 6th, 2016
Share Button

Quickly identifying someone’s core personality traits isn’t easy, even for the shrewdest judge of character. But there’s a way to quickly get an idea of a person’s character.

According to a study referred to in this article, asking someone’s opinion about other people exposes a lot about their own personality. “The more positively they judged those people, the more happy, enthusiastic, capable and emotionally stable they turned out to be themselves…those who judged others more negatively had higher levels of narcissism and antisocial behaviour.”

You may have witnessed this phenomenon yourself; people, particularly those who lack self-awareness, tend to project their personality traits onto others.

As the old saying goes, you don’t see the world as it is, you see it as you are.

Next time you meet someone and you want to get to know the person better, ask his or her opinion of someone. A polarizing figure such as a troubled celebrity would make for a good topic of focus.

But make sure to avoid projecting your own stuff onto your new acquaintance–remain detached and avoid judgment to get the most accurate insight. Also make sure to acknowledge that being objective and honest about a miscreant who wronged someone, for example, is different.

Single out specific personality traits too, particularly if you believe the person may possess that trait. Ask if she thinks someone is duplicitous, for instance. However, the risk is that she may be clever enough to realize what you’re doing and may smoothly manipulate you to make herself appear to your liking.

Also watch their body language, which can be a very effective form of personality analysis. Spotting non-verbal cues that contrast with what the person is telling you can be very amusing (and alarming).

Although it’s tough to get to know someone’s authentic personality in a brief span of time without various forms of security investigations, you may be able to get an idea through asking the right questions.

Copyright © 2016 Scott Petullo

Rationalization: Look Out For This Pernicious Trait to Limit Your Risk

Monday, May 23rd, 2016
Share Button

Rationalization is a universal human trait and most people don’t have it in excess.

Occasionally explaining away behavior such as, “…it’s okay to have extra helpings at dinner tonight because I’m going to the gym tomorrow…” or “…I’ll postpone that important task because it would be better completed tomorrow…” isn’t likely to doom anyone.

The problem is when rationalization takes on a life of its own.

Extreme cases are often a coping mechanism for the subject to deal with her early life trauma, for example.

It may be that she doesn’t intend to intentionally deceive you, but that can be the result with someone who distorts reality to the point where objective decisions are impossible.

It’s a weighty personality red flag and a serious risk to your livelihood, such as with a Wall Street dark prince who gives new meaning to the word leverage, denying the massive level of risk, and a politician who believes his own lies.

The fact is, people are not rational beings.

People do what they do in accordance with their emotional maturity and subconscious fears and defenses. They typically act emotionally and then justify their behavior by offering well-thought-out reasons that aren’t the real reasons.

Thus, occasional white lies and moderate secrecy can morph into stark hypocrisy, a complete lack of integrity, and even deviousness if a person has a serious problem with rationalization.

As suggested in this blog post, people continually act reflexively, unknowingly guided by their subconscious fears and defenses, erroneously thinking they are making conscious, objective choices.

It’s not easy to identify excessive rationalization upon first meeting someone. The out of bounds excuses and justifications aren’t likely to be immediately evident.

If you have a limited amount of time to make a decision about someone, it’s important to find out if the person is a potential risk to your business or personal life. Excessive rationalization is readily identifiable through my non-traditional security investigations.

Copyright © 2016 Scott Petullo

A Reliable Supplement to Trusting Your Gut

Monday, May 2nd, 2016
Share Button

Trusting your gut as a consistent means of discerning the truth takes practice.

It’s rare that someone’s gut instinct is so powerful, and they trust it so implicitly, that they’re seldom wrong.

Most people struggle with the intermittent battle between intuition and reason, with the power of the subconscious mind dominating behavior far more than acknowledged.

This article lists some helpful tips to strengthen your gut instinct. In particular, giving yourself time constraints in making a decision based on your gut instinct, such as thirty minutes, helps to make your intuition a stronger part of your decision-making process.

Even though I value gut instinct, I recommend having multiple sources, including my nontraditional security investigations, to supplement your intuition.

Key decisions are too easily influenced by hidden biases or an emotional attachment to the outcome. The cost of objective decision-making supplements is immaterial compared to the expense and security risk of a bad decision.

Copyright © 2016 Scott Petullo

Decision-making Ability Revealed Through Handwriting Analysis

Monday, February 15th, 2016
Share Button

Decision-making ability is necessary to be successful in life and handwriting analysis effectively measures this important character trait.

“A director makes 100 decisions an hour. Students ask me how you know how to make the right decision, and I say to them, ‘If you don’t know how to make the right decision, you’re not a director.’” George Lucas

A good leader must have good decision-making ability. She is decisive, not vacillating, and lacks fear of finality.

Good decision-making ability greatly increases your potential for success in life, as do these three specific personality traits.

This Entrepreneur article outlines seven important points to help you improve your decision-making ability, including avoiding the temptation to make snap decisions just because the circumstances seem familiar. A very common mistake is ignoring the inherent risk of relying entirely on your gut instinct.

You need clarity to make decisions, and my findings underscore the adage that timing matters. Life consists of never-ending, various phases of time, some rewarding and some challenging.

As I say in this blog post, “Select ominous periods of time relate to everyone, such as during phases of concurrent universal afflictions, but much more often it’s more personal, as related to comprehensive natal and timing charts. Sometimes it’s both. The periods can last for months (even years), or for days or mere hours.”

You can strive to make the most of your circumstances by working through your decision-making process when your timing is most favorable.

Handwriting analysis, part of my unconventional security investigations, is a reliable method to identify decision-making ability.

Copyright © 2016 Scott Petullo

Handwriting: Means of Mental Development and Personality Analysis

Monday, February 8th, 2016
Share Button

Handwriting is a key component for mental maturation and a shockingly accurate means of personality analysis.

The contention that computers, smart phones, and other technology will replace the need for writing is shortsighted.

Handwriting won’t ever become obsolete. Even though people are writing less due to technology, almost everyone still writes, even young people.

Consider some of the many ways people will always need cursive: you learn better when you write it down instead of type or text; the need to be able to read cursive will always exist–e.g., the U.S. Constitution, many other historical documents, and letters your ancestors wrote are in cursive; cursive gives your brain a mental workout so it’s especially good to utilize as you age. Handwriting also helps to dynamically advance cognitive development.

Handwriting analysis is a key part of my systems of analysis in identifying personality traits. I’ve found it to be one of the most objective and non-discriminatory methods of discerning subconscious fears and defenses, including red flag character attributes.

I analyze cursive and printing equally well, and the script of any language can be analyzed. All that is required is the copybook form (i.e., the standard by which the writer learned) of the writing to use as a basis for comparison.

Writing longhand can also provide tremendous psychological release. Remember the last time you poured your feelings into writing a letter to someone close to you, or even to yourself?

The art of writing is too valuable of a practice to abandon. 

Copyright © 2016 Scott Petullo

Warning: First Impressions Are Frequently Unreliable

Monday, February 1st, 2016
Share Button

First impressions are sometimes accurate, yet other times they aren’t.

Unfortunately, they can’t be relied upon for consistently accurate personality analysis.

You may get a feeling about someone upon first meeting, but trying to determine specific personality red flags—and the magnitude of those red flags–is a different matter entirely.

Consider some of the things people attempt to determine upon first meeting you: trustworthiness; intelligence; emotional maturity; leadership ability; whether you are an extrovert or introvert; and a lot more.

According to a Harvard psychologist, the two most pressing concerns people have when they meet you are “Can I trust this person?” and “Can I respect this person?”

Are you a physical threat, and are you a thief? Are you a traitor, or a backstabber? Are you to be admired or despised? Will you be a source of embarrassment?

According to an article in the Guardian, perception of others is clouded by subconscious fears and defenses: “Although our rapid cognition is fairly accurate, it’s still possible for us to misread someone the first time we meet them. No matter how shrewd you might think you are – and most of us like to think we’re a good judge of character – we are subject to all kinds of cognitive biases, which stretch and distort our judgment.”

Listen to your intuition upon first meeting someone, yet also apply objective, rational thought. It’s also a good idea to utilize various methods to detect dishonesty, for example, to confirm any suspicions.

It’s possible to find out if you can trust someone before it’s too late, but first impressions aren’t a consistently reliable method to discern trustworthiness and other important personality traits.

Copyright © 2016 Scott Petullo