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Posts Tagged ‘Personal Fate’

Warning: Key Personality Traits Are Inborn

Sunday, October 22nd, 2017
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The age-old debate rages on: are you born with your personality traits, or do they develop, mostly due to environment?

Ask any parent with multiple children if his or her kids all possessed blank slate personalities from the beginning and you’ll get a look of disbelief and be told all his or her kids were different from the start.

My findings agree with that notion; you are born with your main character traits, both rewarding and challenging.

It may sound “void of promise” to the idealists, but embracing this notion will save you an enormous amount of time because attempts to change another person’s principal character are futile. The core of your personality is carved in stone. It won’t change much, no matter how much effort you put into reinventing yourself. You can, however, learn to maximize your strengths and tone down your weaknesses within the boundaries of your personal fate.

Granted, early abuse by parents or others, for example, may contribute to one’s personality, such as deepening inherent fears and defenses, but it doesn’t change the person’s overall character.

My contention is supported by comprehensive astrology and numerology (based on time of birth data), which relentlessly outlines personal fate, and handwriting analysis, which discerns subconscious personality. Time and time again the latter parallels the former; personality always develops according to predetermination.

You’ve never known someone to change so much that you didn’t recognize his or her unique character because it simply doesn’t happen.

Self-discipline can lead to gradual, small changes, such as quitting bad habits or learning a new skill, but overall personality remains the same.

You can’t transform a reclusive loner into a social butterfly, a Neanderthal thug into a scholar, or one that needs operational structure and supervision into a solo-entrepreneur. Your true nature is fixed and doesn’t change much.

Although most humans can be spontaneous and changeable, each individual’s larger, unique personality framework makes them largely predictable.

Be grateful for who you are, and make every effort to make the most of it. But avoid trying to change other people because it’s pointless.

Instead, learn as much as you can about another’s character because with understanding comes contentment, and possibly a great reduction in your overall level of risk if he or she possesses major, hidden red flag personality traits.

Copyright © 2017 Scott Petullo

Astrology: Why Time and Location of Beginnings Matter

Tuesday, May 23rd, 2017
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Conventional wisdom contends that people don’t have a choice of the location and time they are born. It’s a reasonable assertion, from an earthly standpoint.

But my long-term findings tell me people are born at the exact location and time in accordance with their personal fate. Thus, on a soul level, before incarnating, the person does have a choice, and it has nothing to do with the likes and dislikes of their current personality.

Before someone injects class warfare into this topic and chides me for blaming people for being born into poverty, that isn’t what I’m doing.

I merely report my findings and they show that personal fate (numerous key, life circumstances) is reflected in the comprehensive astrology and numerology charts. A person may or may not like my findings based on his or her birth time and location, but he or she may also not like the fact that night is dark, winter is cold, rain is wet, or an infinite number of other life circumstances and situations. Such is life.

The world is replete with people who were born into poverty yet went on to live a successful and happy life, with or without wealth.

The world is also replete with people who were born into opulence and lived the riches to rags story. The failures may be blamed on early abuse or bad luck, but from a spiritual standpoint, fate trumps logic; a person ends up where they end up at the end of their life because that’s what their personal fate dictates.

A common argument about birth times and places goes like this: “But he could have been born and hour earlier or later, and how do you know the birth minute is correct?”

The fact is (for verified birth times), he wasn’t born an hour earlier or later, and the patterns in his comprehensive charts reflect his overall lifetime themes impeccably, as everyone’s unique patterns do.

As for the birth minute, I automatically assume the birth minute isn’t correct in all cases. Rectification, a process where you weigh multiple potential approximate times of birth in relation to key themes, starting at birth onward, is necessary for every subject to ensure the highest accuracy.

If the minute of birth isn’t known, I can still work with the approximate time. I can even work with only the known full date of birth to ferret out approximate key life conditions, though the closest to exact time and location is preferred.

Births, and other significant beginnings, such as new relationships, jobs, projects, product launches and others, appear to be arbitrary, but I believe they are predestined.

Once you see, as I do, the regular repetition of astrological and numerological patterns corresponding to people’s life circumstances, it’s easy to stop rejecting the concept of fate.

You have free will, but within the confines of your unique personal fate. I say that to also remind you of the rewarding parts of your life.

My recommendation is to live your life with purpose, set realistic goals, and strive to do your best without worrying if the stars are aligned properly for your objectives. When you do initiate (or plan to) something momentous, whether it’s personal or professional, note the time, location, and date, then look into the astrology and numerology.

Not knowing where a particular river goes doesn’t nullify the fact that the beginning leads to the result. The ancients would have thought of our modern-day satellite technology enabling us to map geography, knowing what to expect miles ahead, as something only available to the gods.

The same concept, mapping, applies to divining the general outline of personal fate: the results are consistently acquired from the same groups of factors. When you see, for example, the same fifty-plus indicators symbolizing financial prosperity over and over, it’s easy to conclude the subject will be prosperous.

Time and location of beginnings do matter in astrology and numerology because the culmination is in the starting point. Knowing the general inclination of the ultimate outcome allows you to greatly limit your risk.

Copyright © 2017 Scott Petullo

Philosophy of Fate vs. Limiting Belief Systems

Monday, June 1st, 2015
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My philosophy is that at least 75% of the core circumstances and events in your life are predestined.

It’s a controversial viewpoint because it deflates the contention of unlimited, super-hero type free will and it presents an uncomfortable, even threatening dynamic to the self-help and inspirational speaking field.

Certainly, inspiration is like a welcome jolt of energy to help you approach life head-on, do your best, and make the most of your opportunities.

Yet, there’s nothing wrong with accepting that there is a lot in life that you can’t change.

The case for embracing the notion of predestination:

The philosophy of unchangeable destined events in everyone’s life–challenging and rewarding–is rooted in the concept that there is a vastly bigger purpose to life than personal accomplishment and financial success.

Of course, those things are vital to the progression of the human race and they’re important to me on a personal level too, but there is more to life from a spiritual perspective. In my opinion, the tough stuff in life is necessary because it forces spiritual growth, the ultimate purpose of life.

Considering the daunting reality of being regularly tested throughout your life, responding to being tested, attempting to (and not always succeeding) constructively face your unique crises in life, and otherwise being confronted with things in your life that you can’t control, exposes the New Age mantra “nothing limits you” for what it is–cheap and disingenuous.

In the real world, it’s failure, and gratitude for the lesson, that often opens the door to your optimum path. The world is replete with people who failed in one industry and went on to great success in another, or failed in one relationship and then had success later.

Finally accepting that there are supposed to be occasional insurmountable brick walls in life just may save your sanity when you go through one of life’s inescapable rough periods.

The case for rejecting the notion of predestination:

The inspirational speakers tell you that the most uncompromising prison in the world is a person’s limiting belief systems.

Surely, a pessimist who believes she isn’t worth anything and can’t do anything right won’t accomplish much. Also, I think we can all agree that you should never tell a child that he doesn’t deserve good things in life. Likewise, don’t discourage the impressionable, but don’t exploit their naiveté either, and tell them all they have to do to become wealthy is “get in touch with the abundance of the universe.”

Being mature and rational adults, let’s put aside the pandering and the crowd-pleasing platitudes. Authentic self-help methods and spirituality have nothing to do with escapism.

While occasional flights of fantasy (e.g., dream-castling) may go hand in hand with inspiration leading to great accomplishment, basing your life on pie in the sky fallacies is a recipe for disappointment.

“You can do anything–what you believe you can achieve” may be just the thing you need to hear to get through the day, but truth be told, it’s a lie.

The outright denial of predestination hints at a refusal to accept the hard, cold realities of life, even when they happen. Unfortunately, those who hold such a philosophy tend to suffer resentment, despair, depression, anger, and worse when times get tough. Rejecting the notion that immutable personal adversity exists and that there’s nothing you can do to change some things in life, such as how others treat you, sets you up for misery.

Nothing is limiting about embracing the philosophy of personal fate and unpreventable personal adversity. It shows humility and a realistic outlook on life.

Additionally, having your future predicted won’t cause you to surrender your personal power. The key conditions and happenings of your life can be mapped; they aren’t arbitrary.

Do what you must to ignite the inner flame of inspiration, such as listen to your favorite music, but just remember that failure and success are equally essential to edging you closer to the being you are destined to become.

“Failures, repeated failures, are finger posts on the road to achievement. One fails forward toward success.”
C.S. Lewis

“Success is stumbling from failure to failure with no loss of enthusiasm.”
Winston S. Churchill

Copyright © 2015 Scott Petullo

Avoid The Denial of Personal Fate Trap

Monday, February 16th, 2015
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Motivational speakers tell you they don’t believe in personal fate, yet such a conviction is a dangerous trap that can cause you a lot of anguish.

Inspirational speakers claim the invisible forces that shape us and make us do what we do have nothing to do with personal fate or predetermination.

Some of their usual claims include the following:

  1. All you have to do is activate your internal drive to achieve all your goals.

This is one of the more disingenuous statements made by motivational speakers, particularly those whose success is exclusively from motivational speaking and coaching. Passion is important for success, but other personality traits are equally important, and will increase your chances for success.

  1. You can do anything if you tap into the right emotions; if you’re creative enough, fun enough, and persuasive enough, you can get through to anyone.

This advice reminds me of the Dale Carnegie sales training I had many years ago. Sure, persuasiveness is important (as is not being a manipulative huckster), but tremendous emotional power and persuasiveness won’t change the things in life that you can’t control.

  1. Decision is the ultimate power.

According to this line of thought, all you have to do is make the right decisions, like with casino gambling, and the world is yours. Simply make sure lady luck is on your side. Unfortunately, motivational speakers ignore the fact that you can’t just conjure up lady luck when you want.

  1. Resources like time and money don’t determine your success, resourcefulness does.

It’s clear that resourcefulness is important for success, but tremendous resourcefulness isn’t something you can teach, and “when there’s a will there’s a way” is only true if your goals are realistic—within the boundaries of your personal fate.

  1. The other determining factor of success is mastering personal fulfillment. Feeling good about what you’re doing is vital, and the way to do that is to give back.

Helping others can be a tremendous motivator, but you need a lot more than a humanitarian spirit to achieve your goals.

The denial of personal fate trap, the belief that anything is possible as long as you make the right decisions, can set you up for sorrow and suffering.

You failed to achieve your dreams, even though you did exactly what the motivational coach told you to do.

Imagine believing for twenty years that you caused harm to a friend, not knowing that it was the fault of someone else and that you’re actually innocent.

It’s similar to personal fate. Stop beating yourself up because you didn’t manifest those ambitious goals. As long as you do your best, that’s what matters. Failure is sometimes part of personal fate, as are the experiences along the way.

Adopting an unconventional, spiritual outlook, you escape the denial of personal fate trap and your life becomes much more meaningful and fulfilling.

Copyright © 2015 Scott Petullo