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Security Investigations Archive

The Ideal Partner Possesses These Ten Qualities

Sunday, October 14th, 2018
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Nobody is perfect, but select, dominant personality traits make a person either irresistible, or the opposite, incorrigible.

Everyone has his or her own unique challenging personality traits, to various degrees. Severe, dangerous cases aren’t common, but given there’s at least a chance the person may be a problem for you, leaping without looking isn’t advised.

Below I list ten common, admirable personality traits.

  1. Emotional balance and emotional maturity ensure you can talk through complex issues with your partner without him or her lapsing into a childish and impossible to deal with disposition.
  2. A lack of defiance and stubbornness means your partner is flexible enough to reason and compromise when appropriate.
  3. Authentic humility and modesty translates into a lack of vanity and narcissism. The narcissist’s demands make it a one-sided partnership; he needs near constant attention, praise, and admiration, or he is likely to be unhappy.
  4. A healthy, but not excessive, desire for the acquisition of money assures your partner won’t put the love of money above all else.
  5. A big picture outlook, instead of perfectionism and excessive attention to detail, makes a better partner.
  6. The ability to cope with a reasonable amount of constructive criticism, and a lack of excessive inhibition allow for a healthy alliance.
  7. Objectivity ensures the person won’t hinder himself or herself, and the partnership, with self-deception and excessive fantasy oriented thinking. An inferior sense of discernment can potentially be devastating.
  8. Integrity is one of the most desirable traits a person can have. Those who have great difficulty living up to his or her asserted convictions make appalling partners.
  9. Honesty is also one of the most agreeable traits, for obvious reasons. Insincerity, deception, and lies ruin many unions.
  10. Transparency means you won’t be kept in the dark about important matters. Excessive secretiveness and evasiveness aren’t admirable characteristics.

Please note: clinical behavioral terms (and other extreme expressions and conditions) such as “narcissistic,” “prejudiced,” “evasive,” “envious,” “paranoid,” “confrontational,” “sadistic,” “defiant,” “emotionally unbalanced,” “mental disorder,” “dejected,” “depressed,” “psychotic,” “vindictive,” “deceitful,” “domineering,” “dumb,” “psychosis,” “pathological,” “duplicitous,” “two-faced,” “hot-tempered,” “lacking in integrity,” and “dishonest” aren’t typically addressed in assessments related to potential hires (or other, similar situations) because they are unrelated to the personality qualities needed to successfully do a job. In order to do an assessment under normal conditions within ethical boundaries, the subject first allows permission for the formal analysis. Extreme situations such as an innocent person’s life being at risk and, or dealing with a dangerous criminal might warrant an analysis involving the types of personality characteristics featured in this article.

All of the above personality traits (in the extreme—high risk territory), negative and positive, are readily identified through unconventional security investigations.

While it’s true the perfect partner, either business or personal, doesn’t exist, you can make your life easier by identifying negative attributes before it’s too late.

Copyright © 2018 Scott Petullo

Avoid These Common Risk Reduction Pitfalls

Sunday, September 30th, 2018
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Effectively mitigating risk in your business and personal life equates to more success and less financial loss and wasted time.

Conventional security related risk reduction methods, such as private investigators, background checks, and psychologist interviews are advantageous much of the time.

However, relying exclusively on traditional security related risk reduction methods is ill-advised because these methods aren’t foolproof.

Unconventional security investigation methods, such as the ones I offer, aren’t infallible 100% of the time either, but they can be effective in cases where traditional methods offer limited results.

Examples of traditional methods offering limited results include the following: the subject either refuses to do an in-person psychologist interview or it isn’t feasible; the subject is talented at evading detection, so a private investigator won’t find anything amiss; the subject’s record is clean, but he or she possesses one or more hidden personality disorders.

You’ll reduce the greatest amount of risk possible with a thorough range of checks and balances, utilizing both conventional and unconventional methods.

Below I list common risk reduction pitfalls, and how to avoid them.

  1. A potential business partner impresses you so much you merely ask around about her reputation. But you fail to discover hidden problems, which sets you up for a rough partnership. Save yourself a lot of hassle by first finding out about any personality red flags, along with her true motivations, and the natal compatibility.
  2. A star employee seems to do no wrong, until you place him in the wrong position. Skip this problem by first discovering if the new responsibilities fit his abilities.
  3. You’re considering five different prospects for a new associate hire. Each has the necessary background, skills, and success. Discretion and confidentiality are vital. Are you really going to merely trust your gut after speaking with their former supervisors? That could be a costly mistake, considering the high percentage of new hires that don’t live up to expectations. Avoid that trouble by finding out about their potential red-flag attributes, and level of discretion before you hire.
  4. You’re excited about a new addition to your business and are in the process of planning the date of the initial launch to your potential customer base. You could launch whenever you’re finally prepared to do so, or you could optimize the success of your launch by identifying precise, optimum windows of time within the existing timeframe you expect to launch. Additionally, the approximate date and time of the original idea, and when you tentatively plan to launch (before consulting with an expert about personal timing), speak volumes about the success of the endeavor. Success, learning experience, or disaster scenarios are discernable through personal timing analyses.
  5. Your new romantic interest seems like a dream come true, until it turns into a nightmare. Instead, sidestep misfortune. The approximate time and date you first connected, natal compatibility, along with your collective timing tells the truth of the matter: rewarding romantic partnership, terrible connection, or somewhere in the middle.

Unconventional, along with conventional, security investigations are a fantastic way to avoid risk reduction pitfalls, giving you a huge advantage and peace of mind.

Copyright © 2018 Scott Petullo

Four Things That Wreck Compatibility

Monday, August 20th, 2018
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In a perfect world, compatibility would be entirely up to you. All you would need is the willingness to get along with your romantic or business partner.

Alas, in the real world, genuine compatibility isn’t a choice. It also has nothing to do with background, race, entertainment and dietary preferences, and political affiliation.

Merriam-Webster dictionary defines the word compatible in the following way: “Capable of existing together in harmony.”

While the idea of harmony may be largely subjective, the extremes at either end of the spectrum are easy to identify; you’ve likely experienced that magically rewarding connection with another in which it’s effortless bliss. Alternatively, you’ve probably known someone with whom you share horrible compatibility no matter what you do or say—it’s an uphill battle, all discord and discomfort.

Four Things That Ruin Compatibility

  1. Personality red flags make harmonious connections impossible. A person possessing extreme emotional immaturity, vanity, arrogance, bias, argumentativeness, domineering tendencies and, or any other problematic subconscious fear or defense will continually repel potential partners, no matter the innate harmony.

    Severe fears and, or defenses are, for the most part, ingrained; one can’t simply “rise above” these serious attributes, which are most readily witnessed while the subject is under stress or pressure.

  2. Innate, challenging rapport between two people wrecks compatibility every time. You have zero control over inborn compatibility, which is compatibility on a soul level, for lack of a better way to describe it. You are born with it and it exists between you and another person before you ever meet. This is reflected in patterns derived from birth data, including full date of birth, time, and location.

    Extremes in harmony—rewarding or challenging—are easy to identify once you witness, time after time, the natal patterns symbolizing rapport between couples.

    After doing this work professionally since 1997, my view is that this type of compatibility is most important regarding interpersonal harmony.

  3. Personal timing is either your best friend, or enemy in relation to affinity with another person.

    You both may lack serious personality red flags, and enjoy wonderful natal compatibility, but your respective personal timing keeps you apart. Or, you may share numerous timing patterns which serve as the glue for your connection, but when your timing changes, the partnership dissolves.

  4. A bad attitude mars relationships. This is the only point of the four in this piece that you have full control over. Thus, compatibility is, at most, roughly 25% choice.

    Two people may share excellent interpersonal skills, similar levels of agreeableness and outlooks, and a lack of problematic personality traits, yet possess terrible compatibility, in large part due to contrasting natal and timing patterns. The worse the inborn compatibility between two people, the harder they must work to make the relationship tolerable.

Copyright © 2018 Scott Petullo

Personality Analysis: This is Why Winners Rarely Lose

Monday, May 28th, 2018
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“If you only know yourself, but not your opponent, you may win or may lose. If you know neither yourself nor your enemy, you will always endanger yourself.” [Last Verse, chapter 3, the Art of War, which spawned the following modern proverb] “If you know your enemies and know yourself, you can win a hundred battles without a single loss.” Sun Tzu

I’ve found these words of wisdom to be true. The more I work with personality and predictive analysis, the more I recognize that self-knowledge is one of the keys to success.

Take for example, motivations.

How many times have you heard someone say, “I’m not the money-motivated type”? While it may be true in many cases, it’s amusing when the subject is exceedingly acquisitive and for whatever reason wants to believe she isn’t.

This is exactly the sort of lack of self-understanding that hinders success. For instance, the subject pursues a humanitarian career appealing to what she believes is her altruistic nature, and several years down the road finds herself miserable.

She may very well be altruistic, but she’s secretly motivated by money in a big way, and would be much more successful and infinitely more happy in a commission-based job, such as a real estate agent.

The hidden motivations of others are also the cause of some of the biggest challenges you will face in life. You can spend months or years getting to know someone, but there are ways to cut to the chase and find out right away if he’s a risk to your financial well-being (or worse), such as through my unconventional security investigations.

The subconscious mind is tricky—it hides your true desires and all your fears and defenses.

The better you know your unconscious beliefs, misconceptions, fears, biases, and strengths, the less likely you’ll make a mistake in judgment in high risk situations. Thus, you are more likely to win instead of lose.

Self-knowledge also includes timing.

Everyone has different timing, and knowing the lucrative and not so lucrative phases in your life—the extremes—gives you an enormous edge in life allowing you to capitalize on the rewarding stages and limit your risk in the red-flag episodes.

It’s a rare individual who knows himself and others exceedingly well without much effort, but for the rest of us, delving into the subconscious mind and collective personal timing greatly assists in winning life’s everyday battles.

Copyright © 2018 Scott Petullo

Personality Analysis: Intelligence vs. Intellectualism

Monday, February 12th, 2018
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The basic meaning of intelligence involves mental sharpness, comprehension, and adept application of knowledge.

There are various types of intelligence, including practical intelligence, emotional intelligence, and spiritual intelligence.

In a mundane sense, my findings show that intelligent people more often possess admirable traits such as a tendency to be sensible, realistic, grounded, effective, and no-nonsense.

Intelligent people may be easy to identify during an initial conversation, but oftentimes not. Additionally, subconscious fears and defenses distort objectivity. The stronger a person’s fears and defenses, the harder it is for him or her to see other people’s character objectively. Appearance can be misleading. A person may not come across as intelligent; perhaps he doesn’t have a way with words like intellectuals tend to, yet his solutions and problem solving skills may be light years ahead of his intellectual counterpart.

Alternatively, my findings show that intellectuals more often posses undesirable traits such as self-deception, excessive idealism, and a tendency to be unrealistic.

Espousing the theoretical and unsubstantiated doesn’t fix real world problems such as a stagnant economy and low wages. The money to fund endless government giveaways won’t magically appear no matter how brilliantly the intellectual denies scarcity and no matter how much he ignores the idea of fiscal sustainability.

Some of the key personality traits I review in evaluating intelligence, utilizing my proprietary systems of analysis (including handwriting analysis) include the following: logical thinking; investigative thinking; ability to make distinctions/sense of discernment; inquisitiveness; originality; organizational ability; analytical ability; visionary thinking; flexibility; and quick comprehension.

I also review the following traits, and others, which tend to symbolize a lack of intelligence: apathy; undeveloped mental abilities; superficial thinking; naiveté; emotional immaturity; lack of emotional balance; and disorderly thinking.

Finally, I review the following traits, and others, which intellectuals, not intelligent people, tend to posses—these detrimental attributes keep him trapped in theories and abstract notions (and outdated ideologies), while he avoids hard, cold realities that actual intelligent people come to realize: stubbornness; excessive abstract thinking; excessive fantasy orientation; lack of objectivity; self-deceit; and rationalization.

A person can be highly intellectual and intelligent at the same time, but the negative characteristics listed above, and others, lead the intellectual to make dumb decisions.

Nobody is perfect and everyone has his or her own unique fears and defenses, but it sure does save a lot of time and hassle by knowing ahead of time which person is likely to be more of a challenge than reward.

Copyright © 2018 Scott Petullo

A Common Error That Kills Objectivity

Sunday, December 3rd, 2017
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Bias is one of the most common problematic personality traits.

The inability to make impartial decisions blocks professional success, and destroys personal relationships. It ranks right up there with other atrocious red-flag personality traits such as indecisiveness, dishonesty, vanity, volatile emotions, lack of analytical ability, and lack of discretion.

Bias comes in many forms, and almost everyone possesses some degree of intolerance, but few seem to recognize one of the key factors in the problem with partiality: the subconscious mind.

Being ignorant of or refusing to acknowledge the power of your subconscious mind as it relates to objectivity is one of the most common errors that kill fair-mindedness.

Your perception of others is obscured by your subconscious fears and defenses. The stronger your unconscious fears and defenses, the more likely you are to misread someone upon first meeting, and the longer it will take you to perceive clearly the person’s authentic character, including strengths and challenges.

Examples of subconscious fears include fear of success, fear of abandonment, fear of losing control, fear of failure, perfectionism, conflict avoidance, and timidity. Examples of subconscious defense mechanisms include defiance, excessive secretiveness, domineering behavior, evasiveness, and self-deception.

Aside from distinguishing indisputable facts, no matter how keen your rapid cognitive function, you are likely to see the person as you are, not as they are. Prejudice (almost nobody is exempt), in varying degrees, is a ubiquitous subconscious fear, no matter what a person tells you otherwise. The truth is, most people simply aren’t familiar with the innate fears and defenses hidden in their subconscious mind, which distort their judgment.

Again, everyone is capable of exhibiting bias to some degree, but a severely prejudiced person can be a significant problem in your personal or professional life. Yet troublesome characteristics on the other side of the spectrum, such as lacking a sense of discernment, excessive naiveté, and gullibility can be equally harmful.

One way to get an idea about the level of innate bias a person may have is to ask his or her opinion about a well-known celebrity or politician. Even better, focus on specific personality traits; ask the person if he or she thinks the celebrity is untrustworthy, for example, if you suspect your new acquaintance may be. Those who lack self-awareness tend to project their flaws onto others. Just keep in mind that being objective about the facts, such as someone already having admitted to wrongdoing, or having been found overwhelmingly guilty in a court of law, is a different matter.

Always keeping in mind the potent influence of your subconscious mind goes a long way in dealing with strife and other interpersonal issues in everyday life.

Besides spending years getting to know someone, a way to uncover authentic personality, beyond the persona, is conventional security investigations (e.g., hiring a private detective). Unconventional security investigations, including those I offer, involving handwriting analysis, are a reliable alternative.

Copyright © 2017 Scott Petullo

Common Personality Traits That Kill Relationships

Sunday, November 5th, 2017
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Everyone has his or her own unique personality talents and flaws. My findings show the primary characteristics are inborn.

It’s unfortunate that unconventional appraisal methods aren’t universally part of every young person’s schooling to discover and understand his or her key strengths and weaknesses.

Currently, everyone must discover his or her own personality through trial and error, or through conventional evaluation methods, which typically fail to uncover the authentic personality.

Below I list typical relationship personality red flag traits that wreck personal and professional relationships. I readily identify all subconscious personality traits listed below in my exclusive analyses.

Lack of a reasonable sense of discernment and critical analysis skills translates into the inability to identify and understand personality and relationship issues, and possibly naiveté and gullibility. Combine it with lack of objectivity and the person is likely to avoid taking responsibility for his or her actions. Dishonesty also complicates matters.

Emotional immaturity and, or volatility shows a lack of emotional development and security. He or she will act on emotions (instead of reason), to his or her detriment.

Impulsiveness, lack of control over urges, and recklessness yield poor decision-making, among other challenges.

Self-esteem and ego strength relates to the amount of self-approval and the ability to cope with rejection. Vanity, arrogance, and narcissism are signs of an unhealthy ego. A “big ego” is actually a weak ego.

Conflict avoidance results from a fear of friction in relationships and a fear of not being liked. It’s due to any number of subconscious defense mechanisms such as disassociation, evasiveness, rationalization, secrecy, self-deceit, and vanity.

Suspiciousness, or a fear of trusting people, along with withdrawal or emotionally drawing back, makes relationships an uphill battle.

Other common relationship red flag traits include fear of intimacy, self-consciousness, and fear of sex (or excessive interest in sex).

Personality challenges are more easily recognized under less than ideal circumstances, such as when the person is under a lot of pressure. You’ll only see the persona until something triggers the subconscious fears and defenses.

Knowing a person’s authentic personality gives you understanding, which can ease conflict. It can also greatly limit your overall level of risk.

Copyright © 2017 Scott Petullo

Warning: Key Personality Traits Are Inborn

Sunday, October 22nd, 2017
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The age-old debate rages on: are you born with your personality traits, or do they develop, mostly due to environment?

Ask any parent with multiple children if his or her kids all possessed blank slate personalities from the beginning and you’ll get a look of disbelief and be told all his or her kids were different from the start.

My findings agree with that notion; you are born with your main character traits, both rewarding and challenging.

It may sound “void of promise” to the idealists, but embracing this notion will save you an enormous amount of time because attempts to change another person’s principal character are futile. The core of your personality is carved in stone. It won’t change much, no matter how much effort you put into reinventing yourself. You can, however, learn to maximize your strengths and tone down your weaknesses within the boundaries of your personal fate.

Granted, early abuse by parents or others, for example, may contribute to one’s personality, such as deepening inherent fears and defenses, but it doesn’t change the person’s overall character.

My contention is supported by comprehensive astrology and numerology (based on time of birth data), which relentlessly outlines personal fate, and handwriting analysis, which discerns subconscious personality. Time and time again the latter parallels the former; personality always develops according to predetermination.

You’ve never known someone to change so much that you didn’t recognize his or her unique character because it simply doesn’t happen.

Self-discipline can lead to gradual, small changes, such as quitting bad habits or learning a new skill, but overall personality remains the same.

You can’t transform a reclusive loner into a social butterfly, a Neanderthal thug into a scholar, or one that needs operational structure and supervision into a solo-entrepreneur. Your true nature is fixed and doesn’t change much.

Although most humans can be spontaneous and changeable, each individual’s larger, unique personality framework makes them largely predictable.

Be grateful for who you are, and make every effort to make the most of it. But avoid trying to change other people because it’s pointless.

Instead, learn as much as you can about another’s character because with understanding comes contentment, and possibly a great reduction in your overall level of risk if he or she possesses major, hidden red flag personality traits.

Copyright © 2017 Scott Petullo

The Hidden Cause of Success and Failure

Monday, June 5th, 2017
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Success is entirely attributed to hard work and luck. At least that’s what you’ve been conditioned to believe.

I always recommend setting realistic goals and working diligently, ceaselessly toward your aspirations. But my findings tell me the underpinnings of success are transcendent and have far less to do with mere personal qualities and luck than with forces beyond your control.

Before anyone accuses me of fatalism or recommending a passive, wallflower approach to life, allow me to explain my theory.

Fifty talented corporate executives all possess about the same level of intelligence, self-discipline, objectivity, logical thinking ability, decisiveness, analytical ability, discretion, and all are emotionally balanced and stable. In other words, they all lack red flag personality traits that typically lead to failure. All fifty exhibit strong leadership traits. Each one is a high-achiever and possesses the same ability to be an independent, successful business owner.

All fifty leave the corporate world at about the same time to be independent entrepreneurs. Ten years later, 25 are succeeding wildly, 15 are doing okay, and 10 failed miserably and returned to climbing the corporate ladder.

The successes and failures, in these instances, have nothing to do with market forces; all fifty entered growing industries, under various thriving economies around the world. All fifty are good decision-makers.

You may call it luck, but I refer to luck as personal fate disguised. No matter how resourceful, smart, quick thinking, intuitive, persuasive, or hard working you are, you can’t cheat fate. In other words, there’s a lot in life you have no control over, including the actions of other people. Unfortunately for those 10 washouts, their unique predestination dictated defeat in that area of their life.

Give credit where credit is due—the winners earned their triumphs. My findings show you are 100% responsible for your personal fate. Sudden opportunities and advantages, chance meetings, and similar circumstances aren’t arbitrary and undeserved. Call it cosmic payback, all part of the tapestry of predetermination.

Life’s rewards extend well beyond finances—family relations, friends, love life, and more. A person typically has wonderful predetermination in one or a few areas, but not all. It’s very rare that someone “has it all.” You can’t replicate personal fate, but you can have an equal playing field to seek the opportunities you desire. Life isn’t supposed to be fair, but you can make the most of it by doing your best. Please note: as we say in the above linked article, “It’s not always the case that a person is enduring karmic retribution for past life dark deeds; sometimes the terrible experience is for other reasons, such as to help bring awareness to the world, or stop it from happening to others in the future.”

Fatalism is the belief that you have no control over your life’s circumstances. While I believe at least 75% of your core life circumstances and events are predetermined, I’m not a fatalist; I’m a realist.

The belief that there is much in life you can’t control is a sign of humility. This belief, in conjunction with divination and personality and compatibility analysis, allows you to capitalize on the rewarding parts of life and more easily deal with life’s challenges.

Copyright © 2017 Scott Petullo

Identifying Weakness in Personality Strengths

Monday, May 8th, 2017
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Everyone’s personality strengths and weaknesses are unique and sometimes personality strengths can become detriments.

Under pressure, facades melt away and the true personality traits emerge; sometimes it takes months or even years to get to know an individual’s real flaws.

Since there isn’t a shortage of miscreants in this world, it’s perfectly acceptable to get to the heart of another person’s character; it’s wise to decrease your vulnerability and exposure to excessive risk by any ethical means possible.

You can’t control the actions of a potential business partner, romantic partner, associate, friend, or adversary, but you can get to know them well enough to minimize your risk.

Below I list five personality strengths and the frequently embedded personality challenges in those strengths.

  1. You can be confident an associate with a high degree of discretion won’t disclose confidential information. However, excessive secretiveness and a lack of transparency can derail even the most successful partnerships.
  2. It’s best if a commission-based salesperson, for example, is motivated mainly by money, but excessive acquisitiveness can be a heavy liability for any organization. Clearly, it can be a big problem in marriages or other partnerships too. It’s a fascinating dynamic of the human mind—people regularly give you pretend reasons for their actions, and even believe those reasons, while the actual motivations are hidden in their subconscious mind. Few things in a person’s core behavior are controlled by conscious motives.
  3. Strong attention to detail is praiseworthy in many professions, but excessive perfectionism makes one miss the bigger picture and impedes success.
  4. People who are easy-going and non-judgmental are usually well-liked. However, a lack of objectivity, and a deficient sense of discernment and critical thinking skills yields poor problem solving ability, thus hinders goal-attainment.
  5. Those with a strong sense of responsibility are appreciated, but in the extreme, a savior complex makes one act to his or her detriment.

Nobody is perfect, though it can save you a lot of time and money to look beyond personas to authentic personality, which can be discerned through various methods, including my unorthodox security investigations.

 Copyright © 2017 Scott Petullo