Personality, Compatibility, and Personal Timing Are Measurable With Comprehensive Handwriting Analysis, Astrology, and Numerology

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Personality Evaluations Archive

Common Personality Traits That Kill Relationships

Sunday, November 5th, 2017
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Everyone has his or her own unique personality talents and flaws. My findings show the primary characteristics are inborn.

It’s unfortunate that unconventional appraisal methods aren’t universally part of every young person’s schooling to discover and understand his or her key strengths and weaknesses.

Currently, everyone must discover his or her own personality through trial and error, or through conventional evaluation methods, which typically fail to uncover the authentic personality.

Below I list typical relationship personality red flag traits that wreck personal and professional relationships. I readily identify all subconscious personality traits listed below in my exclusive analyses.

Lack of a reasonable sense of discernment and critical analysis skills translates into the inability to identify and understand personality and relationship issues, and possibly naiveté and gullibility. Combine it with lack of objectivity and the person is likely to avoid taking responsibility for his or her actions. Dishonesty also complicates matters.

Emotional immaturity and, or volatility shows a lack of emotional development and security. He or she will act on emotions (instead of reason), to his or her detriment.

Impulsiveness, lack of control over urges, and recklessness yield poor decision-making, among other challenges.

Self-esteem and ego strength relates to the amount of self-approval and the ability to cope with rejection. Vanity, arrogance, and narcissism are signs of an unhealthy ego. A “big ego” is actually a weak ego.

Conflict avoidance results from a fear of friction in relationships and a fear of not being liked. It’s due to any number of subconscious defense mechanisms such as disassociation, evasiveness, rationalization, secrecy, self-deceit, and vanity.

Suspiciousness, or a fear of trusting people, along with withdrawal or emotionally drawing back, makes relationships an uphill battle.

Other common relationship red flag traits include fear of intimacy, self-consciousness, and fear of sex (or excessive interest in sex).

Personality challenges are more easily recognized under less than ideal circumstances, such as when the person is under a lot of pressure. You’ll only see the persona until something triggers the subconscious fears and defenses.

Knowing a person’s authentic personality gives you understanding, which can ease conflict. It can also greatly limit your overall level of risk.

Copyright © 2017 Scott Petullo

The Great Compatibility Dilemma

Sunday, October 8th, 2017
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Determining the degree of authentic compatibility between two people is, by conventional wisdom, only something you discover after it’s too late.

Whether it involves business or personal relationships, it takes months or even years to begin to understand the character of your partner.

More than thirty years ago I purchased an astrology profiler report, one of those advertised in New Age magazines in the 1980s. Upon reviewing it I sensed there was some validity to it, but that it was too general and imprecise to accurately represent genuine personality.

Since then, through obsessive analysis and empirical observation, I’ve developed a system of checks and balances that involves comprehensive astrology, numerology, and handwriting analysis to determine personality, compatibility, and the timing of personal fate.

Below I outline select key findings and tips to help you save time and avoid the mistakes I made.

  1. Report writing software and similar programs (including the software we currently sell) serve as decent introductions to astrology and numerology, but unfortunately, that’s all they do. All report writing software is based on Ptolemaic aspects (conjunction, square, trine, etc.), elements (fire, air, water, earth), connections between planets and houses, lunar and solar returns, and other elementary components of basic natal charts. It would take an army of programmers decades to write the code necessary for software that could begin to effectively outline character and timing like a seasoned analyst.
  2. Meditate regularly, without fail. Whether it’s to know the next best step to take, to understand another person better, or to figure out how to formulate your own systems of analysis, daily meditation is vital, even if it’s only 10 minutes.
  3. Consider motivations and personality red flags first, then compatibility. Once you know his or her motivations (e.g., money, ego, personal accomplishment, competition, creativity, etc.) and problem characteristics (e.g., evasiveness, narcissism, emotional volatility, emotional immaturity, domineering tendencies, defiance, etc.), determining compatibility is easier.
  4. Remember that everyone has his or her own unique personality challenges and strengths, and nobody is perfect.
  5. Nobody is perfectly honest all of the time. Various forms of dishonesty exist, but most dishonesty is harmless.
  6. Most people are not rational creatures. They always act emotionally and rationalize their behavior by offering logical reasons that aren’t the real reasons.
  7. Real personality traits emerge under pressure or stress. Do something challenging with your partner to get an idea of his or her authentic character. Long-distance travel is a good test, preferably involving heavy jet lag.
  8. The “unexplainable draw” (frequently at the start of the union) is often a good thing, but sometimes not in that it can unfortunately represent the magnetism necessary to learn some of life’s tough lessons.
  9. Everyone has his or her own unique karma, both rewarding and challenging, inside and outside of relationships, and the tough stuff can’t be erased with a magic wand. Personal fate is immutable.
  10. Compatibility isn’t a choice, it’s something two people innately possess, and each two-person connection is unique.
  11. If you spend more than half your energy boosting your sense of detachment and compassion trying to rise above the innately challenging energy of the partnership, you don’t have a satisfactory relationship.
  12. Collective personal timing is immensely important in regards to partnerships of all types. It can be a godsend, or an affliction.
  13. Nobody has perfect compatibility, no matter how harmonious it appears.
  14. Few people have fantastic compatibility that endures.
  15. Most people have mediocre compatibility.
  16. Regarding romantic compatibility, the vast majority of couples aren’t well suited enough to enjoy life-long, monogamous, mutual sexual compatibility. Pretending all is well in the bedroom is a universal pastime.
  17. Besides motivations, personality red flags, and personal timing and karma, mental, physical/sexual, intellectual, social, and emotional compatibility should be reviewed as well to get a good idea of the overall rapport.

You can learn a lot about compatibility by applying unconventional methods. Knowing how you match with another person can deepen your understanding and reduce your overall risk. 

Copyright © 2017 Scott Petullo

The Hidden Cause of Success and Failure

Monday, June 5th, 2017
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Success is entirely attributed to hard work and luck. At least that’s what you’ve been conditioned to believe.

I always recommend setting realistic goals and working diligently, ceaselessly toward your aspirations. But my findings tell me the underpinnings of success are transcendent and have far less to do with mere personal qualities and luck than with forces beyond your control.

Before anyone accuses me of fatalism or recommending a passive, wallflower approach to life, allow me to explain my theory.

Fifty talented corporate executives all possess about the same level of intelligence, self-discipline, objectivity, logical thinking ability, decisiveness, analytical ability, discretion, and all are emotionally balanced and stable. In other words, they all lack red flag personality traits that typically lead to failure. All fifty exhibit strong leadership traits. Each one is a high-achiever and possesses the same ability to be an independent, successful business owner.

All fifty leave the corporate world at about the same time to be independent entrepreneurs. Ten years later, 25 are succeeding wildly, 15 are doing okay, and 10 failed miserably and returned to climbing the corporate ladder.

The successes and failures, in these instances, have nothing to do with market forces; all fifty entered growing industries, under various thriving economies around the world. All fifty are good decision-makers.

You may call it luck, but I refer to luck as personal fate disguised. No matter how resourceful, smart, quick thinking, intuitive, persuasive, or hard working you are, you can’t cheat fate. In other words, there’s a lot in life you have no control over, including the actions of other people. Unfortunately for those 10 washouts, their unique predestination dictated defeat in that area of their life.

Give credit where credit is due—the winners earned their triumphs. My findings show you are 100% responsible for your personal fate. Sudden opportunities and advantages, chance meetings, and similar circumstances aren’t arbitrary and undeserved. Call it cosmic payback, all part of the tapestry of predetermination.

Life’s rewards extend well beyond finances—family relations, friends, love life, and more. A person typically has wonderful predetermination in one or a few areas, but not all. It’s very rare that someone “has it all.” You can’t replicate personal fate, but you can have an equal playing field to seek the opportunities you desire. Life isn’t supposed to be fair, but you can make the most of it by doing your best. Please note: as we say in the above linked article, “It’s not always the case that a person is enduring karmic retribution for past life dark deeds; sometimes the terrible experience is for other reasons, such as to help bring awareness to the world, or stop it from happening to others in the future.”

Fatalism is the belief that you have no control over your life’s circumstances. While I believe at least 75% of your core life circumstances and events are predetermined, I’m not a fatalist; I’m a realist.

The belief that there is much in life you can’t control is a sign of humility. This belief, in conjunction with divination and personality and compatibility analysis, allows you to capitalize on the rewarding parts of life and more easily deal with life’s challenges.

Copyright © 2017 Scott Petullo

Identifying Weakness in Personality Strengths

Monday, May 8th, 2017
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Everyone’s personality strengths and weaknesses are unique and sometimes personality strengths can become detriments.

Under pressure, facades melt away and the true personality traits emerge; sometimes it takes months or even years to get to know an individual’s real flaws.

Since there isn’t a shortage of miscreants in this world, it’s perfectly acceptable to get to the heart of another person’s character; it’s wise to decrease your vulnerability and exposure to excessive risk by any ethical means possible.

You can’t control the actions of a potential business partner, romantic partner, associate, friend, or adversary, but you can get to know them well enough to minimize your risk.

Below I list five personality strengths and the frequently embedded personality challenges in those strengths.

  1. You can be confident an associate with a high degree of discretion won’t disclose confidential information. However, excessive secretiveness and a lack of transparency can derail even the most successful partnerships.
  2. It’s best if a commission-based salesperson, for example, is motivated mainly by money, but excessive acquisitiveness can be a heavy liability for any organization. Clearly, it can be a big problem in marriages or other partnerships too. It’s a fascinating dynamic of the human mind—people regularly give you pretend reasons for their actions, and even believe those reasons, while the actual motivations are hidden in their subconscious mind. Few things in a person’s core behavior are controlled by conscious motives.
  3. Strong attention to detail is praiseworthy in many professions, but excessive perfectionism makes one miss the bigger picture and impedes success.
  4. People who are easy-going and non-judgmental are usually well-liked. However, a lack of objectivity, and a deficient sense of discernment and critical thinking skills yields poor problem solving ability, thus hinders goal-attainment.
  5. Those with a strong sense of responsibility are appreciated, but in the extreme, a savior complex makes one act to his or her detriment.

Nobody is perfect, though it can save you a lot of time and money to look beyond personas to authentic personality, which can be discerned through various methods, including my unorthodox security investigations.

 Copyright © 2017 Scott Petullo

Secrecy—How to Know if You Can Trust Someone

Sunday, January 29th, 2017
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“If you wish another to keep your secret, first keep it to yourself.” Seneca

Everyone has secrets, ranging from inconsequential to momentous.

Secrecy is an integral part of the human experience, largely having to do with the mostly harmless natural defense mechanism to maintain your peace of mind and save face.

For example, you don’t announce to your Facebook friends the graphic details of your most recent red-hot fling to save yourself the embarrassment, even though such posts would be exceedingly entertaining and could make you a social media star.

Sometimes you’re required to share your secrets, such as within a business or investment partnership.

Secrecy is desirable in matters of confidentiality; discretion is necessary to protect proprietary information.

Although it’s feasible extreme secrecy can be a serious liability in partnerships, keeping one’s mouth shut is generally considered advantageous. As long as the intent isn’t to deceive, and extreme withholding doesn’t infringe on trust between associates, it won’t cause problems. 

Of all the personality traits I consider in my character analyses, secrecy is one of the most fascinating for me to examine. It’s very easy for some to keep secrets, but impossible for others.

Extremes are easy to discern, particularly involving people who can’t keep it zipped even if their life depended on it.

Other than my or another professional’s analyses to warn you ahead of time, a way to know if you can trust someone is to spend a lot of time with them. Unfortunately, you open yourself up to a lot of risk in doing so.

It’s okay to keep secrets. In fact, it’s necessary in many cases, such as guarding exclusive information or protecting someone’s safety.

Make sure you avoid trusting the wrong person, but also avoid unnecessary, extreme withholding.

Copyright © 2017 Scott Petullo

People Never Change Much and What You Can Do About It

Monday, November 23rd, 2015
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People never change much. Instead of rejecting this reality, making your life more difficult, try a different approach.

Question:
“Many people change their behavior for the better after long struggles, such as with obesity, addiction or finally finding the right relationship or career. So how can you say people don’t change?”

Answer:
Aside from addicts who get clean and sober, how often have you known someone to change so much you don’t recognize his personality? Never, if you know his true character.

Someone with an addictive personality will always have an addictive personality, and a jerk still has those red flag personality traits seething beneath the surface.

As I say in this blog post, “Discipline and perseverance can lead to small, incremental change, such as finally kicking unhealthy habits, but your overall character remains the same.” Your true nature remains the same no matter what you do.

I say in this blog post, “Handwriting analysis (graphology) shows how a person thinks and acts, along with their emotional balance, maturity, and much more. It denotes past conduct and displays potential for future behavior.”

I assess character as I perceive it now, though I’ve found that people’s core personality traits generally don’t change, just like people’s looks and voices don’t change much; you’ll still recognize her voice or know who she is after not seeing her for years.

Demanding that someone change the way she is will make your life miserable. Instead, just accept that people are who they are, and why not prepare for potential problems? I’m an optimist, not a pessimist, and very pragmatic.

Find out as much as you can about someone, before investing too much time, money, or emotion, because understanding more easily allows you to accept him or her as they are (and limit your risk).

“Money and success don’t change people; they merely amplify what is already there.”
Will Smith

Copyright © 2015 Scott Petullo

How to Identify Problem Personalities Before it is Too Late

Monday, November 16th, 2015
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No matter how high performing an employee, if she’s repeatedly disruptive and problematic to others in the organization, it’s best to fire her. The disruption and demoralization of the staff overshadows revenue generated by the troublemaker.

The same approach applies to your personal life; when possible, get rid of problem personalities before they cause you serious trouble.

It’s possible to identify red flag personality issues before hiring, and the price is a pittance compared to the cost of a problematic employee.

Below I list five tips to identify problem personalities.

  1. In checking employment references, realize that past employers (or acquaintances, if it’s not an employment situation) aren’t going to be candid with you. They will be hesitant to talk about problems with their former employee due to the threat of legal action. But try this: while speaking to the former supervisor on the phone, ask, “Would you hire her again?” and listen for any hesitancy.
  2. Evaluate the subject’s skills related to the job through multiple assessment methods such as personality profiling tests, psychologist interviews, and interviews with multiple members of your staff. If it’s a personal association, pay close attention to how she handles life’s everyday stressful occurrences.
  3. Place the subject in simulated high-pressure situations as part of your pre-employment screening process to get the real personality to emerge. If he is a personal interest, one of the best ways to ferret out any red flags is long-distance travel with him (once you’re sure he’s not dangerous).
  4. Conventional security investigation companies like First Advantage charge $2000 and up to look into any possible red flag background matters, including getting feedback from people who are acquainted with the subject. Keep in mind though that $2000 is the very low end of the price scale and that $7500 and much more is regularly quoted to thoroughly investigate a subject. It often takes a lot of billable hours to find actual red flags. Also keep in mind that some villains are very good at evading detection, so no matter how much the investigators dig they may not find anything.
  5. Consider unconventional security investigations as a reliable, fast, and cost-effective addition to your usual course of action.

Your desires, fears, and defenses influence your gut feelings, so it’s best to avoid relying entirely on your instincts.

Your first impression may be that he is a good match for the job when he isn’t, or that your kids are safe around her, when they aren’t, or that that prospective business partner is ideal when he isn’t.

Unfortunately, gut instinct doesn’t consistently detect a person’s true motivations, especially when stress or emotions cloud your perspective.

Take the time and resources to bring to light any hidden personality red flags of new people in your life before they rob you of more time and money than you thought imaginable.

Copyright © 2015 Scott Petullo

The Ultimate Career Personality Test

Monday, January 19th, 2015
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The ultimate career personality test, one that will quickly and efficiently reveal to business owners the best candidate for the job, or to individuals the optimum career path, is greatly sought after.

The problem is it doesn’t exist, at least one that can be successfully used by amateur personality analysts.

You’ve been there before, undoubtedly: the personality self-test or on-line quiz seemed valid at first, but later you realize it’s worthless. Or, through a brief interview you believe you’ve found a match, yet later you wonder how you could have possibly missed the now obvious red flags.

How does this happen? It’s because genuine, consistently accurate personality analysis is much more complex than using mere gut instinct or relying exclusively on personality analysis self-tests, which are subjective and can be gamed.

The ultimate career personality test involves employing established, objective systems of analysis to identify specific personality strengths and challenges.

After testing numerous methods and forming my own proprietary systems over the last 20+ years, I believe I offer the ultimate career personality test.

I strongly recommend the use of a range of evaluations, including handwriting analysis, in conjunction with other psychological testing methods to determine authentic personality and, or if a person’s abilities match the demands of the job.

The Life Purpose Package, and The Career Compatibility and Assistance Guide (listed on my services page—both involve handwriting analysis) offer dynamic, consistently accurate results.

Although you must consult with me to yield the benefits of my ultimate career personality test, the time and money you save, and peace of mind you gain, is invaluable.

Copyright © 2015 Scott Petullo

How to Identify a Jerk Before it is Too Late

Monday, May 19th, 2014
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Imagine how much time and money you could save by identifying jerks before it’s too late.

As you likely know by experience, select individuals have a greater, more active “inner-jerk” than most other people. Some people are world-class jerks. Jerks commonly possess one or more of several, identifiable, problematic traits.

“Of the billionaires I have known, money just brings out the basic traits in them. If they were jerks before they had money, they are simply jerks with a billion dollars.” Warren Buffett

I’ve found those words of wisdom to be true: people don’t ever change much. Either a person is reasonable most of the time, or they aren’t, and no amount of politically correct consciousness training by sanctimonious gurus permanently changes that.

The majority of people (at least those I encounter) are considerate, but almost everyone has the potential to be a jerk sometimes.

You could waste months or longer on someone before you discover innate maliciousness. One way to reduce the risk in your personal and professional life is to identify jerks through my unconventional security investigations before it’s too late.

Copyright © 2014 Scott Petullo

The Worst Type of Motivation an Employee Can Possess

Monday, February 17th, 2014
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The worst type of motivation an employee can have is extremely dangerous to a business owner.

It’s not excessive desire for money, altruism, social involvement, or any of the other typical motivations that drive a person’s behavior.

The most hazardous motivation an employee can have is a toxic combination of intentional deceit, lack of integrity, and resentment.

These types of employees are disgruntled and believe the company (or government agency) has shafted them; they erroneously believe they are underpaid and should be promoted. The truth is that they are already paid what they are worth. If they weren’t, they could quit and get a higher-paying job.

They become dangerous because they have access to inside information and use that information to profit to the detriment of the business (or country). They don’t care if selling industrial (or intelligence) secrets will damage the organization.

Certainly, these types of people are a threat to everyone; they can wreck havoc on your professional life, as well as your personal life because they lack loyalty and aren’t honest.

Either you thoroughly identify hidden motivations, or risk the consequences.

Copyright © 2014 Scott Petullo